The most important takeaway from Fringe

And so the Minnesota Fringe Festival has completed its run. We have tucked it under the covers and turned out the lights. Goodnight, Fringies, it’s time for bed.

Thank you to everyone who came to “The Magnificent Story of St. Marlene’s Marvelous Moonshine (Made by Monks),” the show with the longest title in all of Fringe. I had set goals for my first year at the Fringe based on what other seasoned performers told me to expect, and we exceeded every one of those goals. Thank you for making it happen!

We had excellent reviews, all four- or five-kitty reviews, nothing less: “This lady is one of the best storytellers I have seen at Fringe,” “funny, smart, conversational, unaffected,” “a must-see show,” and “her homespun charm and dry wit is thought-provoking, hilarious, and emotionally resonant all at once, creating a show that both honors and pokes fun at the South, religion, and family.” The most wonderful compliment of all was a comparison to the great Nancy Donoval.

If you enjoyed the show, there are two options: Patrick and I would love to perform this at other places that appreciate our approach to “unconventional reverence.” (Unitarian-Universalist churches, maybe?) Or you can wait for the novel which I will be working on this fall with the characters of Father Robertson, Brother John, Sister Candace, Beverly, and Candy Cornbread.

But one particular takeaway from the show is more valuable than all the ticket sales or all the reviews in all the world: I made new friends. Thank you for connecting with me, for approaching me after the show, for bonding with me over a few stories about unconventional reverence.

Candy Cornbread’s Big News

Thanks to all of your great responses to my latest story about Candy Cornbread, the pen name and literary heroine of the 75-year-old alcoholic nun who secretly publishes redneck vampire nun erotica. People seem to like her, and I love her positive message for women. For those of you who haven’t heard or read the story, I will tell it in my Minnesota Fringe Festival storytelling show August 4-14, and it will be in my upcoming ebook, Pecan Pie, Cigars, and the One and Only Secret to Happiness.

Because of these responses, Candy Cornbread is going to get her own full-length novel. You will be able to read about how Sister Emily, Sister Caroline, and blend their own unique backgrounds to continue the Candy Cornbread stories, to save St. Marlene’s Abbey from being closed by the bishop, and to inspire women (and men) to seek continuous improvement in their lives.

The bad news? I can’t begin this until after the Fringe show.

Twin Cities Storytelling: Redneck Vampire Nun Stories? Oh, My! July 7

Anodyne Coffee HouseHey, y’all need to go to this! The first Thursday in July, at Anodyne Coffee House in the Kingfield neighborhood of Minneapolis. Come listen to my story, “How Candy Cornbread Survived the Rapture,” and help me decide whether to include this story in my upcoming Minnesota Fringe Festival show, “The Magnificent Story of St. Marlene’s Marvelous Moonshine (Made by Monks).”

Email me at christy@christymariekent.com for more information, or look at my upcoming performance schedule.

Twin Cities Storytelling: “When Life Hands You Lemons …,” June 7, SlamMN!

Hey, y’all need to go to this! The first Tuesday in June, at Kieran’s Irish Pub in downtown Minneapolis, is the next installment in the SlamMN! story slam series. Come listen to my story, “How Candy Cornbread Survived the Rapture,” and help me decide whether to include this story in my upcoming Minnesota Fringe Festival show, “The Magnificent Story of St. Marlene’s Marvelous Moonshine (Made by Monks).”

Email me at christy@christymariekent.com for more information, or look at my upcoming performance schedule.

The Rapture of Sister Candace

On Wednesday morning, Beverly reported to the library at 8:00 and waited in the lobby until the grandfather finished tolling the hour, and then a little longer, to allow Sister Candace time to hide her bottle. When the clock showed 8:02, she entered the library to greet Sister Candace, who by that time had stashed her shine and was buzzed and ready to start the day. She was typing on the computer in her office.

“Are you working on one of your Candy Cornbread stories?” asked Beverly.

“Sure am. Candy’s talkin’ about the rapture, one of my favorite subjects.”

“The rapture?”

“Yes, the rapture, girl. Ain’tchu been payin’ attention? All them bodies of the dead are gonna rise from their graves, up into the air, and the bodies of the saints will be taken to heaven and the bodies of the damned will be cast upon the ground in shame. That’s what the rapture does to the dead: it lifts and separates.”

“Lifts and separates?”

“Like a bra. The apoca-lift.”

From “Candy Cornbread and the Rapture of Sister Candace